Thermoelectric Units
How Do Thermoelectric Units Works?
 
 

In practice, the heat transfer phenomenon described in the section "Basic Theory ", is obtained either by assembling the thermoelectric modules within a complete TE unit, by using each module singularly or in mini-assemblies of multiples of the same module.
The use of air or liquid heat sinks allows the heat transferred through the module(s) to be absorbed on one side and dissipated on the other.

Different ways of absorbing/dissipating heat can be used:

Direct:

usually by means of an aluminium plate whose cold side allows the absorption of heat directly from the object to be cooled, and whose warm side must be attached to an object which allows the heat to be transferred to the surrounding environment.

Air:

by means of an aluminium heat sink usually coupled to a fan. This solution allows the absorption of the heat from a hermetically sealed enclosure and its dissipation into the air of the surrounding environment.

Liquid:

the heat is transferred by means of a liquid-filled circuit, usually made from an aluminium block or another heat-conducting material.
The heat exchange on both the cold and the warm sides may occur in two different ways:

Cold side 
a) The liquid in the circuit is that part of the system which is to be cooled. 
b) The liquid circulating is only a means of transportation and serves to absorb the heat of an object that is difficult to reach.
Warm side 
a) The liquid flows in an open circuit (ie. water which is no longer required). 
b) The liquid flows in a closed circuit (ie. the absorbed heat is dissipated into the air by means of a radiator).
Each of the absorption/dissipation systems can be combined with one of the others. The following combinations are possible:

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